Watch SpaceX Successfully Land A Rocket On A Floating Drone Ship For The First Time

It’s absolutely incredible to watch

SpaceX has finally landed its Falcon 9 rocket on a drone ship at sea:

(I recommend that you watch the whole video of this mission) SpaceX’s Falcon 9 rocket launched a cargo spacecraft to the International Space Station, but most important part is the fact that after several failed attempts, SpaceX successfully landed the first stage of the rocket on an ocean barge. All previous SpaceX’s attempts to land the rocket on a floating drone ship crashed.

[Few days ago, Blue Origin successfully launched and landed their rocket. Watch it here]

Scientists Stored These Images in DNA—Then Flawlessly Retrieved Them

DNA data storage could help us file away the vast amounts of information we continue to generate

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To do it, researchers from the University of Washington first have to convert ones and zeroes that make up a digital file using the four basic building blocks of DNA— adenine, guanine, cytosine and thymine. Once the team’s determined how to represent a file, they then synthesize artificial DNA based on their calculations.

Reading the data is made easier by distinctive markers that the team place within the strands of DNA. The team can sequences the sample, then use these markers to finds the starting point of a file. Then they simply read back the combination of adenine, guanine, cytosine and thymine, use the Huffman coding to convert it back into digital data and—voila!—the files is restored.

Gizmodo / University of Washington (PDF)

See Blue Origin’s Third Rocket Launch, Flight And Landing

Last Saturday, Blue Origin successfully launched and landed another rocket. The rocket deployed its landing thrusters just 1097 meter (3,600 feet) above the ground. Amazing!

A Newly Discovered Triple Sun Planet

How would the skies look like?

That triple-solar view isn’t the only weird thing you’d see happen overhead.

Astronomical Journal published the details of the discovery of this triple sun planet. Gizmodo talked with lead author of the paper Jason Eastman of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics. He sketched out a timeline for what that might look like, both over a few days or thousands of years:

You’d see the primary star about the size of your outstretched, splayed hand (about 40x the apparent size of our Sun). Your year and day would be the same: 3 Earth days, which means half of planet would be in continuous daylight and the other half would be in continuous darkness.

You’d also see two points of light about 2 degrees apart, each as bright as the full moon (KELT-4BC). Those two points would orbit each other every 30 Earth years, and every 4000 years, they’d make a complete orbit in the sky (that is, for 2000 years, they’d rise during the Summer and for 2000 years, they’d rise during the Winter).

Scientists Have A Crazy Plan To Halt Global Warming

With giant problems come giant solutions. But, pumping a vast volume of seawater to Antarctica to freeze it is insane.

Source: Earth System Dynamics

James Webb Telescope: The largest science project in US government history

Precision? The Webb can detect heat generated by a bumblebee as far away as the Moon.

James Webb Space Telescope
The James Webb Space Telescope as it will appear in orbit. Photo: NASA

There is much information about the Universe that is invisible even to the Hubble Space Telescope—and that’s where NASA’s much hyped, two-decades-in-the-making, $8.8 billion-plus James Webb Telescope comes in. The Webb Telescope being built by NASA and its partners is a more direct successor to the Spitzer Telescope rather than the Hubble. In short, the Webb will open up a whole new world of infrared astronomy when it launches in 2018. The telescope will be able to capture images of the very first stars and galaxies, formed only 200 million years after the Big Bang.

Source: Ars Technic

Bodily Heatmaps Of Emotions

Bodily Heatmaps Of Emotions
Bodily topography of basic (Upper) and nonbasic (Lower) emotions associated with words. The body maps show regions whose activation increased (warm colors) or decreased (cool colors) when feeling each emotion.

Emotions are often felt in the body, and somatosensory feedback has been proposed to trigger conscious emotional experiences. The heatmaps reveal bodily sensations associated with different emotions using a unique topographical self-report method. The participants were shown two silhouettes of bodies alongside emotional words, stories, movies, or facial expressions. They were asked to color the bodily regions whose activity they felt increasing or decreasing while viewing each stimulus. Different emotions were consistently associated with statistically separable bodily sensation maps across experiments. These maps were concordant across West European and East Asian samples.

The full reaserch can be found at PNAS

Scientists Warn Of Perilous Climate Shift Within Decades, Not Centuries

A massive boulder on a coastal ridge in North Eleuthera, the Bahamas. A new research paper claims it was likely moved there by powerful storms during the last warm period of Earth history, 120,000 years ago, and warns that such stormy conditions could recur because of human emissions of greenhouse gases. Credit Charles Ommanney/The Washington Post, via Getty Images
A massive boulder on a coastal ridge in North Eleuthera, the Bahamas. A new research paper claims it was likely moved there by powerful storms during the last warm period of Earth history, 120,000 years ago, and warns that such stormy conditions could recur because of human emissions of greenhouse gases. Credit Charles Ommanney/The Washington Post, via Getty Images

An abrupt climate shift could lead to sea levels high enough to begin drowning coastal cities later this century, new research suggests, renewing a roiling debate.

Climate scientists, including ex-NASA scientist James Hansen, warns that our climate could dramatically change within decades, not centuries.

Virtually all climate scientists agree with Dr. Hansen and his co-authors that society is not moving fast enough to reduce emissions of greenhouse gases, posing grave risks. The basic claim of the paper is that by burning fossil fuels at a prodigious pace and pouring heat-trapping gases into the atmosphere, humanity is about to provoke an abrupt climate shift.

NASA’s Kepler Catches Early Flash of an Exploding Star

Shock Breakout

The brilliant flash of an exploding star’s shockwave — what astronomers call the “shock breakout” — has been captured for the first time in visible light by NASA’s planet-hunter, the Kepler space telescope.

An international science team led by Peter Garnavich, an astrophysics professor at the University of Notre Dame in Indiana, analyzed light captured by Kepler every 30 minutes over a three-year period from 500 distant galaxies, searching some 50 trillion stars. They were hunting for signs of massive stellar death explosions known as supernovae.
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