A UFO Is Closing in on Earth and NASA Is Covering It Up, According to YouTubers

Open your eyes, sheeple.​

One of the nice things NASA does is stream live footage from the International Space Station as it orbits the Earth 16 times a day. It’s pretty calming stuff—until a UFO enters the picture. Then all bets are off.

On July 9, NASA was streaming footage from the ISS when YouTuber Streetcap1 spotted something (aliens? probably aliens) entering the Earth’s atmosphere. But as the object (again, almost 100 percent aliens) nears our planet, the NASA feed cut out. While Streetcap1 points out it could be a meteor, we’ve seen Independence Day. We know what’s up. You can see the video below:

That video was quickly picked up by dozens of other YouTube channels. Soon, extremely reputable sources of scientific journalism such as Express.co.uk were quickly on the case, with stories like SHOCK ALIEN CLAIM: ‘NASA cuts the ISS live feed moments after UFO appears.’

NASA has been accused of a ccover-up of the existence of aliens after its video live feed of the International Space Station (ISS) apparently went off just as a UFO appeared to be entering Earth’s atmosphere.

Curious as to why NASA would cover up such obvious evidence of an impending alien attack, the answers was:

“We have never seen UFOs in the popular sense,” said a NASA spokesperson, after a long, deep sigh. “The feed in question is the High Definition Earth Viewing experiment. Anytime the ISS has a signal, that feed is sending down video.”

But when the High Definition Earth Viewing system loses signal, the video stream goes dark. “The feed is not switched manually,” said the spokesperson. “It’s all done automatically. There’s nobody at a control board.

Source: Popular Mechanics

James Webb Telescope: The largest science project in US government history

Precision? The Webb can detect heat generated by a bumblebee as far away as the Moon.

James Webb Space Telescope
The James Webb Space Telescope as it will appear in orbit. Photo: NASA

There is much information about the Universe that is invisible even to the Hubble Space Telescope—and that’s where NASA’s much hyped, two-decades-in-the-making, $8.8 billion-plus James Webb Telescope comes in. The Webb Telescope being built by NASA and its partners is a more direct successor to the Spitzer Telescope rather than the Hubble. In short, the Webb will open up a whole new world of infrared astronomy when it launches in 2018. The telescope will be able to capture images of the very first stars and galaxies, formed only 200 million years after the Big Bang.

Source: Ars Technic

NASA’s Kepler Catches Early Flash of an Exploding Star

Shock Breakout

The brilliant flash of an exploding star’s shockwave — what astronomers call the “shock breakout” — has been captured for the first time in visible light by NASA’s planet-hunter, the Kepler space telescope.

An international science team led by Peter Garnavich, an astrophysics professor at the University of Notre Dame in Indiana, analyzed light captured by Kepler every 30 minutes over a three-year period from 500 distant galaxies, searching some 50 trillion stars. They were hunting for signs of massive stellar death explosions known as supernovae.
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