The World’s First Ever Wireless Hack Was Over Radio

But it was not called “hacking” back then: it was called “scientific hooliganism”.

It is 1903 and it’s all about Marconi, Nevil Maskelyne, and a demonstration that didn’t go as planned.

Marconi’s invention posed a threat to the wired-telegraph industry. In response, the Eastern Telegraph Co. hired John Nevil Maskelyne, a British magician and inventor who had experimented with wireless technologies, to monitor Marconi’s work. According to an article in New Scientist, Maskelyne was able to build broadband receivers capable of intercepting Marconi’s so-called secure transmissions without knowing their frequencies.

In June 1903 Marconi held a public demonstration in London to show how his device could receive a message from a station nearly 500 kilometers away. But before he could receive the message, an intruder delivered this to Marconi’s receiver:

Rats rats rats rats.

There was a young fellow of Italy,

who diddled the public quite prettily.

The message went on to further mock and insult Marconi.

Source: A History of Hacking

Scientists Warn Of Perilous Climate Shift Within Decades, Not Centuries

A massive boulder on a coastal ridge in North Eleuthera, the Bahamas. A new research paper claims it was likely moved there by powerful storms during the last warm period of Earth history, 120,000 years ago, and warns that such stormy conditions could recur because of human emissions of greenhouse gases. Credit Charles Ommanney/The Washington Post, via Getty Images
A massive boulder on a coastal ridge in North Eleuthera, the Bahamas. A new research paper claims it was likely moved there by powerful storms during the last warm period of Earth history, 120,000 years ago, and warns that such stormy conditions could recur because of human emissions of greenhouse gases. Credit Charles Ommanney/The Washington Post, via Getty Images

An abrupt climate shift could lead to sea levels high enough to begin drowning coastal cities later this century, new research suggests, renewing a roiling debate.

Climate scientists, including ex-NASA scientist James Hansen, warns that our climate could dramatically change within decades, not centuries.

Virtually all climate scientists agree with Dr. Hansen and his co-authors that society is not moving fast enough to reduce emissions of greenhouse gases, posing grave risks. The basic claim of the paper is that by burning fossil fuels at a prodigious pace and pouring heat-trapping gases into the atmosphere, humanity is about to provoke an abrupt climate shift.

How YouTube’s ‘SciShow’ launched a real scientific investigation

Back in 2013, YouTube channel SciShow lesson brought viewers to Lake Hillier, an unusually salty lake with a bubblegum-pink hue located in Western Australia.

Three years later, the episode spawned a research project on its own. Researchers with the eXtreme Microbiome Project (XMP), launched a real scientific investigation and profiled the microbial life in Lake Hillier.

They found the algae in question that produces the red hues, but that the color of the lake primarily came from halobacteria and other extremophilic (extreme habitat-loving) microbes that are pinkish in color. The researchers also found a bacteria called Dechloromonas aromatica, which breaks down compounds in chemical solvents. The researchers believe this may be evidence of the lake’s history as a leather tanning station in the early 1900s.

Via: DailyDot

Robots Are Learning To Jog And It Is Terrifying

MAKE IT STOP!

Two-legged robots, AMBER Labs have decided to make their human-like android do a very human like thing: jog – and yeah, it is terrifying to watch.

AMBER-Lab via Popular Mechanics