How to get to the sun?

The first space exploration to study a star up close

If all goes according to plan, starting around 3:30 am Eastern on Saturday, NASA will launch the Parker Probe from Cape Canaveral, Florida. If you’re game to stay up that late, check out the live stream of the launch below (or check back during daylight hours for a replay).

After launch, the probe will make its first pass of the sun in about three months. But it will actually take around seven years to dip down within 4 million miles of the solar surface and get a super-close look at the corona. (The corona extends outward about 5 million miles from the surface.) During those seven years, the Parker Probe will make use of Venus’s gravity to alter its orbit, gradually getting closer and closer to the sun.  Continue reading “How to get to the sun?”

WATCH: A Breathtaking Timelapse Of The Never-Setting Arctic Sun

IT’S ALWAYS SUNNY IN THE ARCTIC

In the polar regions called, the sun never sets in summer — and it looks really nifty when you watch it sped up.

Why Doesn’t the Sun Set ?
Continue reading “WATCH: A Breathtaking Timelapse Of The Never-Setting Arctic Sun”

A Newly Discovered Triple Sun Planet

How would the skies look like?

That triple-solar view isn’t the only weird thing you’d see happen overhead.

Astronomical Journal published the details of the discovery of this triple sun planet. Gizmodo talked with lead author of the paper Jason Eastman of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics. He sketched out a timeline for what that might look like, both over a few days or thousands of years:

You’d see the primary star about the size of your outstretched, splayed hand (about 40x the apparent size of our Sun). Your year and day would be the same: 3 Earth days, which means half of planet would be in continuous daylight and the other half would be in continuous darkness.

You’d also see two points of light about 2 degrees apart, each as bright as the full moon (KELT-4BC). Those two points would orbit each other every 30 Earth years, and every 4000 years, they’d make a complete orbit in the sky (that is, for 2000 years, they’d rise during the Summer and for 2000 years, they’d rise during the Winter).